What has happened to Harajuku Fashion?

by: Azra Syakirah

January 29, 2021

Tokyo is famous for its wild and crazy, pure and creative, limitless and shocking fashion. The locals agree that Harajuku is where all the action happens. There is a special kind of energy that flows in the area, and anyone who’s ever been there has felt it.
 
Gossip began to spread in the fashion world at first about the “death” and the demise of the Harajuku essence.
Recently, this topic of discussion became widespread. Everyone was paying attention. This area was the birthplace of legendary streetwear brands: BAPE, Undercover, and Neighborhood. How can it be out of creativity? 
 
Media, especially international media, can sometimes blow things out of proportion. Here’s a not-so-short rundown and a little insight from a certified fashion pro.

The rise of Harajuku style

person in harajuku fahsion jacket in Japan with glasses in street.

Image Credit: Dick Thomas Johnson
There isn’t a specific style to describe Harajuku fashion. From gothic lolitas and weekend cosplayers. To the retro rock ‘n roll to kawaii put-together. This mix of non-mixing is what made Harajuku oh so special and enticing.
 
There were many “zones” in Harajuku that make up the neighborhood. From the reigns of designer labels such as Yohji Yamamoto and Comme des Garcons. To pioneering Japanese streetwear labels like A Bathing Ape and Undercover. It’s safe to say Harajuku had it all.
Even the ones that were not flashy in style were a style. As streetwear became prevalent, subcultures formed. To this date many have studied them, making them legendary
 
Many associate the oversized, laid-back casual look to be Japanese-sty. As well as the all-black look. It took elements from Japanese tradition, as well as Western influence. Like lolita and kawaii made styled neon evocative of Japanese style.
It only goes to show that, even though these looks are total opposites, they still resemble the same thing. There is no one style to Harajuku fashion.

The decline and fall

Lolita girls in full harajuku fashion

Image Credit: Elvin
Many who saw of the shifting of styles said the decline and fall of Harajuku fashion was imminent. The change in Harajuku’s fashion scene judged as drainage of its original essence.
 
Harajuku used to be an organically-born, creative hub. Now it’s become managed by big name brands and companies. Tourism boomed and globalization forever changed the once sacred fashion area.
It became a tourist attraction. 100 Yen stores filled every corner joined by even businesses and banks.
 
Many creatives had to adapt and became main stream. Others disappeared. Having to adapt to different modes of access and prices, it is no wonder the Harajuku scene changed in a huge way.

Evolution of Harajuku 

Harajuku fashion ladies standing in a row posing

Image Credit: Elvin
The styles of Harajuku fashion have changed a lot since its early days. The truth is it’s evolving. The evolution of something means it will not remain in its original form.
 
Harajuku fashion has never been one specific style. And it doesn’t only describe the crazy and loud fashion that are famous. It refers to a special zone of no judgements, and limitless creativity.
If the past few decades have told us anything it is that fashion changes so fast. And those things that create the most change are usually weird!

Harajuku’s present and future

Harajuku fashion girl with denim dress in busy street

Image Credit: Dick Thomas Johnson
The colors may have faded from the streets of Harajuku, the passionate souls still exist. This neighborhood has become the heart of people who want to express themselves.
It has become a safe zone for some, and home to others. People interact and connect. And new talents are often discovered. 
 
People all around the world come to Tokyo to experience the Harajuku vibe. While it may not be what you see in magazines, it is the modern-day Harajuku. It’s still oozing with energy and bustling with new fashion tribes. It’s still the spot where fashion trends are born and made.
 
It is safe to say that Harajuku is not dead. The Harajuku people are always trying out new clothes and styles. It’s a change, not an end. Who knows, in the next century, this is what they could define as Harajuku fashion.
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